Thursday, September 30, 2010

Anyone got contacts in Sydney?

After a very successful trip to Sydney in August I am returning for the last two weeks of October. I would be very interested if anyone has any contacts who might be interested in the presentations and workshops that I run on how to improve Decision Making.

Any contacts would be greatly appreciated.

http://tiny.cc/nv6v9

Wednesday, September 29, 2010

Help Them Buy Without Being Pushy

Whatever you're selling, whether it's a product, a service, a message or a cause, you can't pressure people into "buying". Maybe that worked in the past, when all the power was with the salesperson, marketer or leader. But that's no longer the case. Today's buyers are smarter, better informed and more sceptical than ever before. This isn't only true for products and services; it's also true for causes and messages - maybe even especially so.

So how do you get through to them? Rather than trying to manipulate, cajole, browbeat or force them to buy, create "buying frames" that explain the reasons for them to buy.

I'll explain ...

Everybody is asking these four questions:
  • Why this? What are the benefits of your offering?
  • Why you? What authority do you have for me to believe you?
  • Why now? What is the urgency for me to take action?
  • Why me? Why is this the right fit for me?
Before they buy, they must answer all four questions in their mind. You can help them by suggesting some answers.

Let's consider each of these in turn.

"Why this" (benefits)

This is the standard sales technique of describing the benefits, not just the features, of your offerings. Features are "what this does"; benefits are "what that means for you".

One simple way to convert features to benefits is to list each of the features in turn, then add the phrase "so that" or "which means that", and then finish the sentence.

For example, if you're considering the features of a car:
  • This car has cruise control ... so that ... you don't get a speeding fine
  • The car has radio controls on the steering wheel ... which means that ... it's safer because you're not distracted while driving
  • This car has keyless entry ... which means that ... it's faster to get into the car in an emergency - particularly for women alone at night
The same applies when you're selling a message. That's why you see messages like, "$20 a month pays for a child's education". That's turning the feature (your donation) into a benefit (the result). Make sure you do the same with your message.

"Why you" (authority)

People buy from people they trust. Why should they believe you, your business and the people in your business?

Do you have testimonials from other happy customers, endorsements from well-known people, formal qualifications or practical experience?

Focus on the kind of authority that matters most for your customers - for example:
  • Some people respect celebrities, so get celebrity endorsements;
  • Doctors respect letters after your name, so pharmaceutical companies engage experts to talk to doctors about medicines;
  • Business owners respect experience more than qualifications, so prove your experience.

"Why now" (urgency)

You see this sort of marketing everywhere:
"Mid-season sale - two weeks only"
"Register now for the Early Bird special"
"Only 20 memberships available at this price"
"Closing down sale - all stock must go"
"New season fashions coming soon - current stock at bargain prices"
This is the motivator for them to take action now, rather than putting it off until later. It's usually based on pain or pleasure - that is, the negative consequences of not taking action or the positive consequences of taking action.

This can be the most important factor that gets the sale; however, it can also be the most difficult to do, because it's not always easy to do this without being manipulative.

If you genuinely do have a reason for making an urgent announcement, do so and your customers will respond. But if you keep doing this over and over again, they'll soon grow weary and skeptical.

A more respectful approach is to explain why now, more than ever, your offerings are important and relevant for your customers. It's not about forcing them to buy; it's about explaining how their circumstances have changed - perhaps without them realising it.

For example:
  • A real estate agent could say, "There's never been a better time to sell your home", based on the strength of the property market.
  • An accountant could say, "The new tax laws could cost you thousands of dollars".
  • A restaurant could say, "The economy is booming - come in and celebrate with your friends!"
  • A business consultant could say, "The Internet is making it easier for competitors to put you out of business"
In all these cases, it's not enough to just state that claim; back it up with evidence.

"Why me" (fit)

Finally, explain why your customers are a perfect fit for your offerings. This means identifying, understanding and addressing a niche market.

Mass marketing is dead, folks! Look for smaller, targeted niches that you serve, and serve them well. The smaller your market, the better your products, and the more effective you can make your marketing.

People like knowing you understand them. Not just because they're a member of homo sapiens, but because they are a single mother looking for part-time work, or an accountant working their way up to partner, or an Apple user wanting to date another Apple user (I'm not kidding!).

Here are some questions to ask yourself when writing your marketing material:
  • What makes them tick?
  • What makes them different from other people?
  • What differences are they proud of?
Then turn your attention to your product or service:
  • How have you tailored it to them?
  • Why is it more relevant, useful and valuable to them than to anybody else?

How do you put this into practice?

Now that you understand these four questions, look at the way you promote your products, services, causes and messages. Do you answer all four questions in your potential customer's mind? If not, change this now - it will make a big difference to the impact of your message.

Sunday, September 26, 2010

Please join us to celebrate World Day of Interconnectedness on 10th October

Members of Differencemakers Community and Leaders Cafe are honoured to present a 24 hour webathon as part of our contribution to celebrate the second World Day of Interconnectedness on 10th October.

Presenters, representing 8 countries are, Maria Carlton, Terry Power, Krishna Iyer, Richard Norris, Kwai Yu, Sara Knowles, Andrew Thorp, Luis Cochofel, Rob Brown, Sandy Foster, Lorna McDowell, Mike Parker, Richard Hames, Melissa Giovagnoli, Maria Neves, Kellie Frazier, Joel Graham-Blake, Gino Federici, Marilyn Jess, Julie Poland, and myself. We start in the first minute GMT time on 101010.





Please download the ebook Our World of Interconnectedness written in celebration of this day by Dr Ann Villiers from Australia, David Bernard-Stevens from United States of America, Derek Small from United Kingdom, Heather Davis from Australia, Kwai Yu from United Kingdom, Leo Sonneveld from The Netherlands, Maria Carlton from New Zealand, Marilyn Jess from United States of America, Navinder Narang from India, Pat Armitstead from New Zealand, Prem Sarkar from India, Raj Bhowmik from India, Roshanna Evans from United States of America, Shelley Dunstone from Australia, and myself.

Be the difference you want to see in the world.
Ian

Saturday, September 25, 2010

Decision making: handling information

Our brains have evolved over hundreds of thousands of years to help us survive and to that end they are highly effective decision making instruments. However in modern day situations, and especially in business, these mechanisms for decision making may not be the best. So rather than spending time on developing sophisticated decision making strategies it is bound to be useful to understand some of the mechanisms that our brains have developed to make decisions. By understanding these mechanisms we can become sensitised to their shortcomings and so develop approaches to counteract these shortcomings and thus make better decisions.

The way we process information is critical to our decision making. Unfortunately we do not always process this information correctly. We do not always see what is actually there. If we are basing our decisions on correct information which we have processed incorrectly this will obviously lead to faulty decisions.

We tend to see what we expect to see. Have a look at the following diagram. Which square looks darker, A or B?



The vast majority of people think that square B is lighter than square A. However if we draw some uniform grey bars on the diagram we can see that A and B are exactly the same shade.



In the first diagram without the bars we make the assumption that the cylinder is casting a shadow and our brains automatically make the B square appear lighter than it actually is. Now look back to the diagram without the bars on. Even though you know that squares A and B are exactly the same shade B still appears to be lighter.

Here is another example of how we see what we expect to see rather than what is actually there. Try reading the following:

I cnduo't bvleiee taht I culod aulaclty uesdtannrd waht I was rdnaieg. Unisg the icndeblire pweor of the hmuan mnid, aocdcrnig to rseecrah at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it dseno't mttaer in waht oderr the lterets in a wrod are, the olny irpoamtnt tihng is taht the frsit and lsat ltteer be in the rhgit pclae. The rset can be a taotl mses and you can sitll raed it whoutit a pboerlm. Tihs is bucseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey ltteer by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe. Aaznmig, huh? Yaeh and I awlyas tghhuot slelinpg was ipmorantt! See if yuor fdreins can raed tihs too.

Even though all the words are seriously misspelt we still impose meaning on them. We are not seeing what is actually there but what we would like to see and what we expect to see.

So that is just a couple of examples of how we see what we expect to see rather than what is actually there. In order to make effective decisions we need to see what is actually there not what we expect to see.

If you would like to improve your decision making by seeing what is actually there, try making a list of the ways that you see what you expect in information rather than the actual information. When you have done this you could go through the list and see if you can develop any techniques that would help you see information as it actually is.

There is another way in which information affects our decision making. That is when we have to much information. The next diagram is a simple picture. It is not animated in any way. However when you look at it, it will appear to be moving.



This is a nice example of how too much data causes confusion. Even though the diagram is not moving it still appears to move because of the way our eyes view the picture. If you don't believe that it is not moving try focusing on one individual spot. You will see that it is not moving but other areas appear to move. Then try to focus on one of the areas that still seems to be moving. It will now appear to be stationery and other areas will appear to move. Or if you focus on the two small red markers on the two top, middle circles, you will see that these circles are stationery.

If you would like to improve your decision making try making a list of the ways that too much data causes problems for your decision making. When you have done this try going through the list and see if you can devise techniques that would help.


Ian Moore runs workshops and gives presentations on how people and organisations can improve their Decision Making by understanding how they make poor ones. For more information see:

http://www.unthinkablethinking.com

or email Ian at:

ian@unthinkablethinking.com

Thursday, September 23, 2010

Become a guerilla

I recently read a piece in the weekend paper about a Los Angeles based enterprise that has converted a number of old vending machines into green machines that sell seed bombs. Greenaid (www.thecommonstudio.com/index.php?/project/greenaid/) hopes to promote guerilla gardening with people buying seeds which come in a mixture of clay and compost that can be thrown anonymously into derelict urban sites to reclaim and transform them. What a great idea!

There was actually an Australian TV show called “Guerilla Gardening” but it didn’t last long. Seems our councils didn’t take too kindly to the TV people showing them up. After all, if these guys can come in and transform an ugly piece of public land in a day what excuse does the council have?I think I might have to start performing random acts of guerilla gardening. Remind me to put some supplies in the boot of my car . . .

When I think about it, there have been times when I’ve performed random acts of guerilla workplace gardening. For example, giving advice to people who have leaders that can’t rely on, making suggestions to friends about ways to deal with difficult co-workers and encouraging people I meet at events to go for promotions.

What the guerillas are trying to teach us is that you don’t have to wait for permission to show leadership, you don’t have to be the official leader of a team to lead them and sometimes you need to jump in and take the lead when no one else is willing to tackle an issue. If you are passionate about making change happen and not prepared to wait around for someone else to do it then you have guerilla tendencies in you already. The question is: are you going to act on them?

So, what random acts of leadership could you perform? Are you prepared to go out on a limb to do them or are you too worried about what the workplace “council” will think?

Monday, September 20, 2010

Decision Making and the brain

I will start by stating the obvious, we make decisions with our brains. But let us consider what our brains are for. They have evolved over
hundreds of thousands of years to help us survive and to that end
they are highly effective decision making instruments. However in
modern day situations, and especially in business, these mechanisms
for decision making may not be the best. So rather than spending time
on developing sophisticated decision making strategies it is bound to
be useful to understand some of the mechanisms that our brains have
developed to make decisions. By understanding these mechanisms we can
become sensitised to their shortcomings and so develop approaches to
counteract these shortcomings and thus make better decisions.


Let us just think for a moment about bad decisions and how much they cost. Think for a moment about how many people in your organisation
make bad decisions. How much money is your organisation losing each
day because of bad decisions? If you had a small improvement in
decision making, say 10%, how much would that save: on a daily basis;
over a year. This is perhaps difficult to quantify but if even just
one major bad decision could be turned into a good decision then the
benefits could be immense.


We can make better decisions. The good news is that we have a brain! In our brain we have over ten thousand million neurons and the number of
possible interconnections between these neurons is 10 followed by 100
zeros. We have an immensely complex piece of machinery in our brains.
However, is the brain fixed in the way it processes information?


In order to drive a traditional black cab in London a taxi driver has to pass 'the knowledge'. This is a test about the streets of London and
the best way to navigate around them. It has been known for some time
that the hippocampus, an area of the brain, is responsible for
processing geographical information. In the year 2000 a team from
University College London scanned the brains of some taxi drivers and
found that their hippocampuses were bigger than those of normal
people. This is a really significant finding! It shows that exercise
and practice can physically develop areas of the brain and increase
the connectivity of the neurons.


The bad news is that the brain has a very specialist design. It has evolved over hundreds of thousands of years for survival purposes and
not necessarily for making the best business decisions. Part of the
specialist design is our memory systems. When brain scans are done on
chess players some interesting results are found. Masters and Grand
Masters seem to have activity towards the rear of the brain which is
normally associated with our memory systems. Less competent chess
players tend to have most activity towards the front of the brain, in
the pre-frontal cortex, which is normally associated with decision
making. When we make decisions are we using our memory of past
situations or analysing each situation anew?


Large areas of our brains have developed for pattern recognition. This is obviously useful for recognising objects and faces. Unfortunately we
also tend to see patterns when there are actually none there.


Our brains are also very good at establishing habits. These are very useful 'short cuts' to our decision making processes. We don't need
to think about everything that we come across on a daily basis. Let's
have a look at one habit we have developed – how we fold our hands.


So let's try it out. I'd like to ask you to fold your hands. If you look at your hands you will notice that one index finger is above the
other one. When we are young we have to learn to fold our hands like
this. Each way is equally likely at this point. However a habit
quickly forms and one way becomes dominant. When we are older we will
usually only fold our hands in one way. So for most of our lives we
have been folding our hands in only one way. You would think that a
habit as well established as that would be hard to break. But let'
try this. Try folding you hands so that the other index finger is on
top. What does it feel like? Most people find this quite
uncomfortable but bear with me for a moment. Let's try slowly folding
our hands back to the original position and slowly back again to the
second position.

And then back again,

and back again,

and back again,

and back again,

and back again,

and finally back again.

Now just shake your hands.

So let's try it again. I'd like to ask you to fold your hands again. Can you remember if this is the way you did it originally?


What's interesting about this is that most people, after only five repetitions, feel much less awkward. Some people cannot even tell the
difference any more. This is a very simple example of how a life long
habit can be overturned (or at least lessened) by only five practices
at doing it a different way.


We have seen that our brains have some limitations when it comes to decision making.

The good news is that if we understand what these limitations are we can reprogramme even long established habits. We can also grow parts of
our brain.


So if we can understand how our decision making works, we can spot the deficiencies in our decision making. Knowing what these deficiencies
are we can take countermeasures to improve them.


Ian Moore runs workshops and gives presentations on how people and organisations can improve their Decision Making by understanding how they make poor ones. For more information see:

http://www.unthinkablethinking.com

or email Ian at:

ian@unthinkablethinking.com



Sunday, September 19, 2010

Start with Why by Simon Sinek

This TEDx talk by Simon Sinek Start with Why is a classic.

Applying Simon's lessons will take your personal and business life to a whole new level. It has mine!



Be the difference you want to see in the world
Ian
Founder Differencemakers Community
Catalyst for changing what’s normal for the good of people, our planet, and for profit

Sign-up here for a least one free resource per month and to get your complimentary copy of my ebook Differencemakers - how doing good is great for business.

Wednesday, September 15, 2010

Books, E-Books and the E-Publishing Revolution

E-books have finally come of age, thanks to new devices that make them easy, convenient and practical. In this issue of the Focal Point podcast, Chris Pudney and Gihan Perera discuss what's available for you as a consumer, author or publisher.

Listen to the episode here, or download the MP3 file:


MP3 File

Subscribe to our podcast here.

Additional resources:

Tuesday, September 14, 2010

Sequence and frequency - keys to building business relationships that matter

I recently re-read (for the fourth time!) Seth Godin’s book Permission Marketing - turning strangers into friends and friends into customers.

What jumped out at me this read was Frequency is the holy grail of marketing.

I asked myself and I ask you, How frequently do you stay in touch with your customers/clients? My answer was not frequently enough and I resolved to do better, mindful of Dunbar’s law that 150 meaningful relationships is about all we can handle at any one time.

I made a list of my 150 best business relationships and I am going to stay in touch more frequently. I am also going to be more mindful of sequence.

Aside from referrals I have 5 entry points to begin business relationships: my monthly ezine, my monthly gift list, my elearning trial, my possibility pulse check, and when people join differencemakers community.

When people sign-up for any of these they have become followers. My quest then is to turn a percentage of followers into friends and some of them into fans. I know from 20 years experience that when I am in regular contact with my 150 friends I have more than enough business.

What are your entry points?

As I reviewed my processes this week I decided that I am good at welcoming people when they become followers however my sequence of staying in touch from there needs improvement.

What is your sequence of staying in touch? Are you random like me, or do you just contact people when you have something to offer them?

I have resolved to ensure that my sequence of contact with my friends is really valuable to them and I have begun by asking my friends what would be really valuable for you to receive from me?

I encourage you to ask your friends the same question and please answer it for me by sending me an email or getting in touch.

Be the difference you want to see in the world
Ian
Founder Differencemakers Community
Catalyst for changing what’s normal for the good of people, our planet, and for profit

Sign-up here for a least one free resource per month and to get your complimentary copy of my ebook Differencemakers - how doing good is great for business.

Saturday, September 11, 2010

Can common sense be the common thing?

My understanding of history is that tensions between the middle east of our world and the west, predate both Christianity and Islam. Yet as I reflect today on the tragedy of 9/11 it seems to me that folk with fanatical religious beliefs are determined to widen the gap between east and west.

The case in point of course is of Christian Pastor Terry Jones of Florida in the USA, with a congregation of about 50 people, who has threatened to burn copies of the Koran today as some sort of protest. I fervently hope he doesn’t proceed. If he does, he clearly doesn’t understand the big picture nor some of the central teachings of his own religion.

I am not interested in what Mr. Jones or anyone else believes. Beliefs are aways betrayed or enhanced by what we do.

I respect Mr. Jones’s right and everyone’s right to believe whatever you want to believe. I do not accept anyone’s right to act on our beliefs in ways that harm or increase the possibility of harm to others.

In my previous post I expressed the power of defining moments in our lives and how living the lessons of such moments enriches our lives.

My hope today, on the 9th anniversary of a turning point in history, that I hope will turn out to be a catalyst for good, is that common sense will prevail and that common sense will not be as it sadly often is, the uncommon thing.

Be the difference you want to see in the world
Ian
Founder Differencemakers Community
Catalyst for changing what’s normal for the good of people, our planet, and for profit

Sign-up here for a least one free resource per month and to get your complimentary copy of my ebook Differencemakers - how doing good is great for business.

Thursday, September 9, 2010

Living our lessons from 9/11

My grandson Hamish was born a week after 9/11. On 9/11, the day my daughter was due to give birth, my wife was in Perth with my daughter and I was home in Adelaide with a flight booked to fly to Perth on the 13th. My wife and I spoke on 9/11 about what kind of a world was our first grandchild likely to grow up in?

On the day of my scheduled flight, the airline Ansett, then an iconic company, closed its doors and not able to get a flight on another airline I drove to Perth, a 36 hour drive. What occupied my mind for much of that trip was the question, what is the purpose of my life?

I couldn’t even begin (still can’t) to imagine the horror for those who died in the World Trade Center and the devastation for their families, yet it inspired me to think deeply about my own life, and how I could do more to make a difference in the world. The long drive to Perth was full of defining moments for me where I made decisions that still drive my life and my work. One of the decisions I made was to dramatically increase my work internationally.

In 2005 my wife and I were in London partly due to my work and partly for holidays. We traveled on the Tube the day after the terroist attack on that rail system. You could feel the fear and yet also the resolve of travellers to not be beaten by people who commit terroist acts. This experience was another defining moment for me in my life.

What have been your life’s defining moments? I have had many, some big like those events mentioned above and some small yet significant moments that inspired me to change what’s normal about my life.

Big and small, what have been the lessons of the defining moments of your life? And how are you living your lessons today?

Soon I will have a moment of silence to remember those who have lost their lives in terroist acts and for the thousands affected who remain alive, and yet I will leave my silence with a resolve as strong as ever to be the difference I want to see in the world.

Ian
Founder Differencemakers Community
Catalyst for changing what’s normal for the good of people, our planet, and for profit

Sign-up here for a least one free resource per month and to get your complimentary copy of my ebook Differencemakers - how doing good is great for business.

Tuesday, September 7, 2010

All change is personal first

I am currently working with a client on a major change initiative and as is usually the case with such projects some people wait for others to make changes to their behaviour before they will consider changing!

All change is personal first and leadership is not about waiting, rather having the courage to be the first to make changes.

To inspire and encourage personal change, all my initial work when I partner with clients on change projects is to help individuals change intention, feelings and thinking before even contemplating behaviour change.

I start with the leadership team and as people begin to make intention, feeling, and thinking changes, the behaviour changes that are needed start to become obvious. I then introduce Marshall Goldsmith’s feedforward exercise to facilitate the beginnings of behaviour change. I highly recommend Marshall’s book What Got You Here Won’t Get You There which details feedforward and many other great ideas that inspire personal change.

Feedforward is perhaps more valuable than feedback. Individuals

1) Pick one behaviour they would like to change

2) They describe their objective with someone 1:1

3) They then ask that person for two suggestions for the future that might help them achieve their objective. The only response to give to people who give feedforward is Thank You!

Sometimes people need encouragement to identify the behaviour changes they need to make. Marshall Goldsmith’s 20 transactional flaws can help with with such identification.

1. Winning too much
2. Adding too much value
3. Passing judgement
4. Making destructive comments
5. Starting with “No,” “But,” or “However”
6. Telling the world how smart you are
7. Speaking when angry
8. Negativity, or
“Let me explain why that won’t work”
9. Withholding information
10. Failing to give proper recognition
11. Claiming credit that we don’t deserve
12. Making excuses
13. Clinging to the past
14. Playing favourites
15. Refusing to express regret
16. Not listening
17. Failing to express gratitude
18. Punishing the messenger
19. Passing the buck
20. An excessive need to be “me”


Feedforward is a very powerful exercise. Try it. It will help you immensely to be the difference you want to see in the world.

Warning: Work on intention, feeling, and thinking change before behaviour change. When these four are in alignment positive changes to results are a consequence.

Ian
Founder Differencemakers Community
Catalyst for changing what’s normal for the good of people, our planet, and for profit

Sign-up here for a least one free resource per month and to get your complimentary copy of my ebook Differencemakers - how doing good is great for business.

Wednesday, September 1, 2010

You've messed up. So what?

So you’ve vowed to exercise four times per week and you only went once last week. Are you thinking that you should just bail on your goal because you messed up? Of course not! Don't be putting that "L" sign up on your forehead and jumping to conclusions about yourself. There's not a straight line between right here where you are and the ultimate outcome you're seeking.

The process of setting and achieving goals is just like anything else in your life – it’s not going to be perfect and you aren’t going to be perfect just because you set them. Even if you go into your goal with full commitment there are many potential potholes, such as:

· Longstanding habits that need to change to achieve the goal
· Unanticipated circumstances
· Not seeing results quickly enough
· Seeing too many early results, so we think we don’t have to follow the plan
· Overly ambitious target dates
· Other goals competing for time and energy

Lighten up on yourself and give yourself an opportunity to learn. If you wait for your mindset to be completely right to move forward, for the stars to be in complete alignment and the wind to be blowing in the right direction you’ll never take action, and that won’t get you even a little bit of progress. If your goal has swerved to the side of the road here are some possible actions to take:

Make sure your goal is in written form, all the way from the big result to the itty-bittiest action step. Otherwise your brain just might revise the goal (usually downward) or you might forget a key step.

Double-check to make sure your goal is specific and measurable with a target date. When you rely on “I’ll know it when I see it” your feelings of success will correlate more with your mood swings than with your actual progress.

Put the action steps right into your PDA or calendar so you won’t accidentally schedule over them.

If you’ve found that one path didn’t work, evaluate why and revise that piece of your plan to take another shot at it.

Check your self-talk. Are you sabotaging yourself with secret messages that say you can’t do it? Manage your mindset by writing some affirmations and keeping them in the foreground.

Consider sharing your goal to gather support and accountability from others. If your mom loves to bake your favorite pie but you’re trying to drop 15 pounds let her know about your goal. She’d not want to inadvertently sabotage your progress.

Give yourself a clean slate with no self-recriminations and start again. Persistence makes more difference over the long haul than does immediate success.

Remember there are two accomplishments associated with any goal.
1.The first, of course, is the achievement of the goal.

2.The second, one you might not stop to consider, is the accomplishment associated with better understanding yourself, your motivation, and your strategies for overcoming the inevitable obstacles that stand between you and whatever it is that you want to achieve.

If you decide to make it so, life is a continuous self-improvement process. There is no finish line. This doesn’t mean that you’re never good enough. This means that you are fallible, yet have incredible potential for greatness that you’ve not even started to tap. If you’ve messed up be kind to yourself and forgive…then pick yourself up and get on with it from whatever position you're in.

Prime Minister “Julia Abbott”

It is almost 2 weeks since Australians voted for our next Federal Government. Or at least some citizens voted. The informal vote (i.e. a non vote) was the third highest vote suggesting 15% of people who put their voting papers in the ballot box don’t want either Julia Gillard or Tony Abbott as Prime Minister.

Messenger News journalist Matt Abraham's highly humourous article today Good people of 'Straya, listen up, sums up what a lot of people are thinking. You can read all of Matt’s article here.

I agree with this point of Matt’s: The position of Leader of the Opposition will be abolished immediately. We no longer need one. This nation, ‘Straya, is grown up enough now not to have a political system where half the people are paid to oppose the people who are elected to run the place.
Thank you for bringing us to our senses. Frankly, I don’t know what we’ve been doing fighting each other all this time when we could have been working together to better serve you all.


Are you serving all your stakeholders? To do so is the challenge and task of everyone in business, to provide the value to all our stakeholders that they demand, desire, and feel they deserve.

The first step to serving stakeholders is to ask them what is the value that they demand, desire, and feel they deserve? Australian politicians like most politicians didn’t ask, they told, lectured even, and then wondered why we were confused at the ballot box. And becasuse of all the huffing and puffing and posturing since election day most Australian’s have turned off, and politics has another nail in its coffin.

When was the last time you asked your stakeholders want they want? How often do you ask? How many different ways do you ask? And, how quickly do you take action on what people are telling you?

I maybe able to help you. On most Monday mornings wherever you happen to be in the world I can provide a 30 minute mentoring session for free. All you need to do to book your session is email me ian@ianberry.au.com with a date and time. If I am already booked I will email you back with alternative dates and times.

Be the difference you want to see in the world
Ian
Founder Differencemakers Community
Catalyst for changing what’s normal for the good of people, our planet, and for profit

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