Thursday, December 4, 2014

How To Write the About Page For Your Web Site

How To Write the About Page For Your Web SiteThe "About Us" (or "About Me", or "Biography", or "The Team", or whatever you choose to call it) page of your Web site is important, because people want to know they are dealing with real people - not just a cold, unfriendly online presence. But many Web site owners struggle with this page, so it tends to end up as a bland list of qualifications or an uninteresting history of the team members.

If you're finding it a challenge to write this page, use my "Four E's" formula to help get your ideas in order.

(Note: If you have a team, you'll have to decide whether you should do this for each of your team members or for the team as a whole. Either option can work, and one will be better than the other for your organisation.)

Expertise

You don’t choose an expert on price (If you require a heart transplant, you don’t say “Get me the cheapest heart surgeon”). Promoting yourself as an expert allows you to charge higher fees; focus on clients’ problems, not your services; and positions you as a trusted adviser, not a slick salesperson.

So don’t be shy about positioning yourself as an expert, and describing your expertise – right at the top of your profile.

Experience

Expertise is about what you know; experience is about numbers that add to your expertise. For example, you might talk about the number of years you've been in business, the number of clients you've worked with, the number of countries where you have clients, the number of projects you've done over the years, the number of audience members who have heard your presentations, and so on.

Focus on experience that's relevant to your site visitors. If you're a professional speaker, for example, the number of audience members you've reached might be significant, but the number of words in your book is not!

Education

Describe your educational qualifications - both formal education and professional qualifications. Again, only include it if it’s relevant for clients.

A long list of qualifications doesn't automatically add credibility. So again, be careful to only include what's relevant.

Also be careful not too appear too qualified, because that can sometimes be a disadvantage. For example, saying you have a Ph.D. can sometimes work against you because you might be perceived (wrongly, of course!) as too formal and academic.

Endorsements

Finally, if you have some high-profile endorsements from respected authorities, industry or general publications, or other places, include them here. For example, when Forbes magazine listed me as its #5 social media influencer in the world in my area of expertise, I used that endorsement everywhere!

Use the Four E'S as a starting point.

I hope you'll find this formula useful for starting your About page. You don't necessarily have to follow this formula exactly, of course. But if you're stuck or struggling to get started, it's an easy way to write something first, and then you can work on refining it later.

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