Monday, January 25, 2016

The foremost framework for sustaining a learning culture

Below is the 4th of my Monday Morning Momentum videos. It's the final in the series of looking at the fundamentals of ensuring employee engagement naturally rather than trying to force it.


You can gain access to past and future videos, and the resources packages to help you take action in your own best way that accompany them, by registering here. This is a complimentary service exclusive for people who register.

In February's videos and associated resources I'll be diving deeper into what makes these fundamentals stick and as consequence increased and sustainable positive momentum in your business.

Should you see yourself as being on a quest to be the best version of you, and to be the kind of leader who inspires others to be the best version of themselves, then February's videos and resources will be of great value to you.

Be remarkable.
Ian

To be who we are,
and to become all that we're capable of becoming,
is the only purpose in life.
Robert Louis Stevenson

Thursday, January 21, 2016

Customer-Centric Innovation

When most organisations think of their customers, they think only of doing things for them. That’s good, because it means you focus on serving them. However, customers now have more power and influence than ever before, and are happy to help you as well. Involve your customers and clients in your innovation programs, so you can provide better products, services and experiences.

If you want to be more customer-centric in your business, watch the recording of my webinar “Customer-Centric Innovation”:

After the webinar, I asked participants “What was the most useful thing you learned today?” Here are some of their answers:

“Innovative beliefs and attitudes towards customer-centric focus”

“Amazing, diverse ways of involving customers in our business and business design”

“Engage more with the customer”

“The questions made me think more about how I can involve clients”

“Crazy ideas may not seem too crazy after all!”

“Importance of placing greater focus on customer needs/wants”

“Be more active in engaging customer’s opinions”

“Areas to consider for involving customers more “

“A reminder to be generous in sharing with your customers – this will enable better engagement and more innovative/better products/services”

“The whole format of the session”

“Need to have an external focus and be open to understanding the changing landscape and not be rigid in what how we engage and approach our cutomers”

“Being more open to the customer/client input and asking them in various ways”

The Future Proof Webinar Series

This webinar is part of my Future Proof webinar series, which will keep you in touch with our future - what's ahead, what it means for us, and how to stay ahead of the game.

In each webinar, I'll cover an important topic about the future - for example, the shift of power to Asia, the changing workplace, healthcare technology, the shift to customer-centric business, big data, and more. This is not just theory; I'll also give you practical examples and ideas for you to future-proof your organisation, teams, and career.

It's free to register, so go ahead and do that now!

Register here

Monday, January 18, 2016

The great culture creator: candid and convivial communication and conversations

Here's the third of my Monday Morning Momentum videos. It's about the great culture creator - candid and convivial communication and conversations.



The first two videos which you can view here are about how role clarity precedes accountability and the power of performance possibility plans. These are the critical tools that focus communication and conversation.

In the next video I'll be exploring the other sibling in this fabulous family of four which creates the context for candid and convivial communication and conversations. Act on these four in your own way and you will ensure employee engagement.

Then in the first People, Process, and Profit Monthly Intensive, being held via web TV at 5 p.m. AEDT on January 28th, I'll be deep diving into these four in an engaging Q & A that will help you to overcome your greatest personal and business challenges in your own best way and in the process ensure employee engagement.

At a special link for those registered to receive my Monday Morning Momentum videos there's also resources to help you take action.

Register here and you'll receive future videos direct to your inbox, have access to video and additional resources archives, and be able to participate in the monthly intensives.

Be remarkable.
Ian

Monday, January 11, 2016

The Power of Performance Possibility Plans

Here's the second of my Monday Morning Momentum videos. It's about the power of performance possibility plans.



The first video was about how role clarity precedes accountability which you can watch here.

In the next videos (Monday the 18th and Monday the 25th) I'll be exploring the other two siblings of this fabulous family of four - candid and convivial conversations, and a key foundation of a learning and development culture.

When these four are in place employee engagement is ensured.

Then in the first People, Process, and Profit Monthly Intensive, being held via web TV at 5 p.m. AEDT on January 28th, I'll be deep diving into these four in an engaging Q & A that will help you to overcome your greatest personal and business challenges in your own best way.

At a special link for those registered to receive my Monday Morning Momentum videos there's resources to help you take action.

Register here and you'll receive future videos direct to your inbox, have access to the additional resources, and be able to participate in the monthly intensives.

Be remarkable.
Ian

Thursday, January 7, 2016

The One Thing You Must Never Do With Your Inbox

The One Thing You Must Never Do With Your InboxAre you constantly struggling to stay ahead of an overflowing inbox? There are plenty of apps, tools, and other technology to help you get control of your inbox. But most of them only help you process your e-mail faster. That can help, but it’s not enough. We get so much e-mail that it’s never fast enough. Trying to get your inbox empty is an impossible task.

Unless you do one thing …

What’s the real problem here?

Too many people use their inbox as their To Do list. But that’s just dumb.

Your inbox represents other people’s priorities, not yours. If you treat your inbox as your To Do list, you’re letting other people run your life.

Don’t believe me? Just take a quick look at what’s sitting in there now. You might find …

  • A request from your boss or an important client
  • A request from a colleague or freelancer to review a task you gave them
  • An invitation from a friend to dinner in two weeks’ time
  • A request to complete a two-minute customer satisfaction survey
  • A few e-mails newsletters
  • A notification from Facebook that somebody liked your photo
  • A message that somebody has changed their address and wants you to update your address book

Now think about this: If you were consciously making a list of the top 3, 5 or even 10 things you want to achieve today, would any of these items appear on it?

Maybe the first two would, because they are important and relatively urgent. But the others wouldn’t. Nor would most of the hundreds (or thousands!) of other e-mail sitting in your inbox.

So why do you leave it there? All it does is distract and depress you every time you check for new mail.

The good news is: It’s easy to fix this problem.

Here’s the The One Thing You Must Never Do With Your Inbox: Never, never, never leave e-mail sitting there for more than five seconds after you open it.

Yup, five seconds!!!

In practice, that means there are really only two things you can do when you open a message:

  1. Delete it.
  2. OR Move it somewhere else for later processing.

This is the path to Inbox Zero.

The term “Inbox Zero” was coined by productivity expert Merlin Mann. The goal is simple: an empty inbox every time you check it.

That might seem impossible, but it’s not.

The solution is to check e-mail as often as you like, but only process it when you’re ready. In other words, separate these two activities. Otherwise you’ll be filling your day with other people’s priorities.

Here’s how this works:

  1. Check your inbox for new mail.
  2. For every message, either delete it or file it for action. I have four action folders “Today”, “This Week”, “Next Week” and “Later”, where I put incoming mail based on its urgency. Even very urgent e-mail gets put in the “Today” folder.
  3. While you’re doing this, do not be tempted to act on any message, regardless of whether it’s trivial, urgent, or anywhere in between. Simply shunt it into a folder and move on to the next message.
  4. At the end of this process, your inbox will be empty! Even though you haven’t processed any of the messages, it’s amazing how an empty inbox can make decision making easier.
  5. Now, if you received any urgent e-mail, act on it. But you’ll usually find that nothing needs immediate action, so go back to your other work. You’ve satisfied your psychological need to check e-mail, so you can return to the unprocessed e-mail later.

At first glance, this might seem like you’re just shuffling e-mail around. But don’t underestimate just how good it is to see an almost empty inbox every time you open it, and an empty inbox soon after.

Getting to Inbox Zero now

When you achieve Inbox Zero, it’s easy to keep it that way. But what if you already have an overflowing inbox now? Simple – just create a new folder (e.g. “Old E-mails From May 2015″) and move everything from your inbox now into that folder. When you have time, gradually go through that folder and process the e-mails as required.

Be brave and do this! You’re no worse off because you haven’t lost any mail. But you do have an empty inbox, and you can keep it that way – forever.

Look at the benefits of this process …

This is a simple process, but it’s very, very powerful – for example:

  • You can check e-mail frequently. It only takes a few seconds each time, and there’s no risk of it taking you off track. You don’t need to “discipline” yourself to only check twice a day, or carve out chunks of time each day for prcoessing e-mail, or whatever.
  • Forget the two-minute rule. This process contradicts David Allen’s Getting Things Done advice to act immediately on an e-mail that takes less than two minutes. I’ve never liked that advice because I might knock off a whole bunch of two-minute actions without ever making progress on important projects.
  • You focus on YOUR priorities. Emptying your inbox this way – without acting on any of the e-mail – keeps you firmly focussed on your priorities.

Remember: Never, never, never leave e-mail sitting there for more than five seconds after you open it.

Do yourself a favour and try it now!

Want to know more about productivity for yourself and your team?

There's more in the Productivity chapter of my book "There's An I in Team". This chapter looks at personal and team productivity in a very different way: setting goals as 90-day projects, planning your path ahead, managing e-mail, and staying on track.

If you’re interested in tapping into the power and potential of the people in your team, this book is for you.

Monday, January 4, 2016

Role clarity precedes accountability

Here's the first of my Monday Morning Momentum videos. It's about how role clarity precedes accountability.



In the next 3 videos I'll be exploring the sisters and brothers of role clarity - performance possibility plans, candid and convivial conversations, and a key foundation of a learning and development culture.

Then in the first People, Process, and Profit Monthly Intensive, being held via web TV at 5 p.m. AEDT on January 28th, I'll be unpacking this fabulous family of four in an engaging Q & A that will help you to overcome your greatest personal and business challenges in your own best way.

At a special link for those registered to receive my Monday Morning Momentum videos there's resources to help you take action.

Register here and you'll receive future videos direct to your inbox, have access to the additional resources, and be able to participate in the monthly intensives.

Be remarkable.
Ian